Candidates threaten to boycott next week’s Democratic debate – live | US news

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‘They’re ugly’

There’s a campaign going on in Washington that even the most garrulous members of Congress aren’t eager to talk about: to be part of a team of uncertain size, with a risky mission, to be named by a leader who isn’t talking about what she’s looking for or when she will decide.

Welcome to the race within the House to win a spot on the Democratic team that will prosecute the impeachment case against Donald Trump, the AP writes.

The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, is the sole decider, but she has offered no hints as the impeachment saga accelerates toward an expected vote next week by the full House and, in January, a Senate trial.

“When the time is right, you’ll know who the people are,” she told reporters Thursday.

The impeachment managers will have to withstand the scrutiny and risk of prosecuting the case against Trump from the floor of the Republican-held Senate, before a global audience. And be willing to face the near-certainty of defeat, as the Senate appears unlikely to convict and remove Trump from office.

“They’re ugly,” Representative Steve Chabot, Republican of Ohio, said of the Senate proceedings. He would know, as a manager of former president Bill Clinton’s trial two decades ago.

Plenty of ambitious people are quietly jockeying for the job by writing Pelosi letters nominating themselves, spreading the word or just hoping their work impresses her.

The eventual group picked seems certain to be diverse in race and gender, providing a contrast to the 13 white, male Republican lawmakers who prosecuted the case against Clinton. (Trump’s defense at the trial will be conducted by his legal team, not lawmakers.) There’ll also be a desire for a geographical spread.

The Senate informs the House when the managers can present the articles of impeachment. The House prosecutors theatrically cross the Capitol and enter the Senate chamber, presided over by the supreme court chief justice John Roberts and populated with senators who act as the jury.

The House members then read the resolution containing the articles and leave until the Senate invites them back for the trial. The prosecutors, possibly assisted by outside counsel, present the evidence against Trump and respond to any of the president’s lawyers or senators.

The US Capitol

The US Capitol. Photograph: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images



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