EU blasted over ‘democratic deficit’ as Brussels decides Juncker’s successor | World | News

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Mr Czaputowicz argued the election of the bloc’s chiefs should be “more legitimised”.  Currently the EU’s heads of governments nominate their candidate to replace the president of the European Commission, which has been criticised for not giving European voters much of a role in the EU’s governance.  He told German media outlet, Wiener Zeitung: “The European Union suffers from a democratic deficit. 

“It should be more legitimised. The legitimacy comes from the acceptance of the nation states and their parliaments, which constitutes the essence of democracy. 

“Therefore, we find that the role of national and parliamentary governments elected by the national parliaments should be strengthened, even in EU decision-making.” 

This comes as Poland’s biggest critic in Brussels, Dutch Frans Timmermans, lost to Ursula von der Leyen in the bid for the top Commission job. 

Ms von der Leyen is seeking to replace Jean-Claude Juncker and has made pledges on the climate crisis, Brexit, an EU minimum wage and gender quotas for company boards. 

Mr Czaputowicz also said: “It is also about attitudes to the future development of the EU. 

“The constellation of people signalled a departure from federalism by rejecting the top candidate principal.” 

He said that easten european states should also be representated in the top jobs of the EU for “politcial balance”. 

The minister said if Emmanuel Macron wants a deeper integration of the EU, he should support the idea of a top candidate model as at the moment the government decides among themselves who takes over. 

He also said he wants an “economically competitive Europe, which will be weakened if competitiveness is reduced”. 

The Foreign Minister, who has been in the role since 2018, said Poland represented the essence of liberal democracy. 

He said: “Above all, liberalism concerns economic freedom, and liberal democracy means the power of the people, free elections, the rule of law, and the strengthening of civil society. 

“The opposite of liberal democracy are the protectionist democracies, which pose a threat to the economy.” 

Additional reporting by Monika Pallenberg 



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